Comments for Honey Traveler http://www.honeytraveler.com Everything in the world about honey Sun, 19 Apr 2015 13:44:30 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.3 Comment on Raw Honey by Scott http://www.honeytraveler.com/types-of-honey/raw-honey/#comment-433318 Sun, 19 Apr 2015 13:44:30 +0000 http://www.honeytraveler.com/?page_id=229#comment-433318 Hi Sandy:

What a great idea! Thanks for sharing it with us!

For anyone interested in trying mead, it can be a great way to enjoy the unique flavor of the honey. Just like wine makers create delicious unique wines with different grape varietals, mead makers can use specific types of honey to create delicious unique flavors of mead. And as Sandy says, it doesn’t necessarily mean that meads are sweet. I have tried delicious dry meads as well.

…Scott

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Comment on Raw Honey by Sandy Holdom http://www.honeytraveler.com/types-of-honey/raw-honey/#comment-433169 Sun, 19 Apr 2015 10:13:50 +0000 http://www.honeytraveler.com/?page_id=229#comment-433169 I am an ex bee keeper Sometimes when I was not quick enough to extract the honey from the comb and the honey had crystallized, I had a problem. I could have cut it all out hand gently heated everything until the wax and honey had separated, but what a lot of trouble. So I came up with the idea of removing the capping, putting the combs end on down into a plastic bucket (as many that would fit)and placing a couple of house bricks on top to keep the frames from floating up. Then filling with water, throwing in a little dried bread yeast and covering with a piece of plastic cloth around the bucket and held tight with a piece of elastic to allow the carbon dioxide to escape but prevent any oxygen entering. If I calculated by weight the ratio of honey to water then I could calculated the final alcohol content (about 14% would be good). That would mean that all the honey would be eaten up by the yeast cells and I would end up with a dry (but tasting a little sweetish because on the natural taste of honey). The resultant mead was delicious. The little yeast cells laboured away eating out all the honey from the comb and then I would gently rinse the combs with warm water and put them straight back into the hives to be filled up again. The perfect solution. Cheers

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Comment on Raw Honey by Scott http://www.honeytraveler.com/types-of-honey/raw-honey/#comment-432054 Thu, 16 Apr 2015 14:07:40 +0000 http://www.honeytraveler.com/?page_id=229#comment-432054 Hi Cal:

As a rule of thumb, the hard (crystallized) honey may be considered raw, that is:
1/ Not microfiltered. Strained is ok.
2/ Not heated excessively (less than 95F)
3/ No additives or refining (nothing added nor removed). Such as corn syrup but also including antibiotics in the hive, and nectar replacements to feed the bees, such as sugar water.

But hard or hard and white is not sufficient to be considered raw honey (not in North America and many countries-EU countries may be different). It is completely possible for raw honey to be liquid, just as it is possible for a hard white honey to be overheated, microfiltered with additives such as sugar or corn syrup.

Finding honey that has not been heated during processing is the most difficult of the three conditions as many beekeepers use heat (100F to 130F roughly) to make the processing of honey quicker and more efficient, even if they are not using heat to pasteurize or slow crystallization. They often heat the honey room for this very purpose, while not directly heating the honey (the honey still warms up). Because of this, “Unpasteurized” honey can still be heated excessively.

And the term “raw” is not an officially sanctioned term for honey. Anyone can call their honey “raw” with impunity.

You are right about the efficacy of honey being related to the length of time the honey is heated. There have been studies done with heating honey to measure the destruction of enzymes for instance and the antibiotic properties. It is related to time and temperature.

I would tend to believe the label of honey that used “raw” to describe it, but as I have mentioned before, because of the lack of standards, the best way to determine the nature of the honey you are buying is to talk to the beekeeper that actually bottles the honey and ask.

The most reliable way to determine if a honey is unprocessed is to buy it in the comb… but even this way doesn’t guarantee it to be free of chemical additives used in the hive, nor from bees fed sugar water.

…Scott

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Comment on Raw Honey by Doug http://www.honeytraveler.com/types-of-honey/raw-honey/#comment-432029 Thu, 16 Apr 2015 12:29:17 +0000 http://www.honeytraveler.com/?page_id=229#comment-432029 You mention the temperature affects honey. Have some experiments been done to determine what different temperatures affect different properties of honey such as 100, 110, 120, 130 degrees etc. I have had this question for a long time that if temperature is bad for honey to be kept in it natural state then pouring boiling water over it must do some damage and yet that along with baking is how many people use honey. Just eating will obviously be the best way to benefit but if you are using it to sweeten food or beverage then there is going to be a loss of some of the good things you pay premium price for. Does it damage it right away or does it take 1,2,5 minutes of exposure to the heat in order for you to lose the “good” properties of honey.
Thanks and Bee Well

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Comment on Raw Honey by Cal http://www.honeytraveler.com/types-of-honey/raw-honey/#comment-427984 Sat, 04 Apr 2015 19:24:39 +0000 http://www.honeytraveler.com/?page_id=229#comment-427984 Hi Scott. I’m wondering if you can help me understand something about raw honey. The hard white, raw honey and the unpasteurized golden. This one local supplier in Canada has 2 choices in the organic section of the supermarket. One is the raw white, which I know is the best. But the other is an unpasteurized golden which looks a little murky. But It does not say raw on the bottle. And I have seen a few particles, probably from the hive floating around. I guess my question is, will this golden variety still have all the health benefits of the one that was labeled raw, and why is this one not labeled raw? Thank you for your help.

Cal

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Comment on Raw Honey by Scott http://www.honeytraveler.com/types-of-honey/raw-honey/#comment-427152 Thu, 02 Apr 2015 21:47:01 +0000 http://www.honeytraveler.com/?page_id=229#comment-427152 Hi:

For speaking, I assume you are referring to the English expression “Honey Tongued”. This simply means someone who speaks convincingly, often using flattery to be persuasive.

For hair coloring, I am going to make a leap and assume you are referring to “Honey Colored Hair”. I am no expert, but I believe this simply means a blond hair coloring in a caramel shade.

:)
…Scott

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Comment on Raw Honey by Tiffany http://www.honeytraveler.com/types-of-honey/raw-honey/#comment-426945 Thu, 02 Apr 2015 05:59:34 +0000 http://www.honeytraveler.com/?page_id=229#comment-426945 Hi Scott, been reading/studying up in raw honey benefits in general for I want my family to start enjoying the benefits for immune system. I also read it can help with digestive issues. Which type of raw honey do you recommend for those benefits? We are from Oregon. Many farmers markets around, but I want to buy the best honey possible. What do I look for? And how much do you recommend to consume daily to benefit immune system/digestive tract? Thank you,
Tiffany

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Comment on Raw Honey by celeste watson http://www.honeytraveler.com/types-of-honey/raw-honey/#comment-426003 Mon, 30 Mar 2015 20:19:08 +0000 http://www.honeytraveler.com/?page_id=229#comment-426003 I just want to commend you on your extraordinary patience in answering the same heating question over and over and over and over… clearly people aren’t taking time to read the string. Your thorough directions and thoughtful,long answers must leave little time for anything else! I stumbled onto your site while searching for a source for a raw honey my husband was given by a colleague whose father is a German beekeeper — it is not an exaggeration to say it was one of the most amazing, scrumptious food experiences of my life. He has brought home honey from many countries for me – spain, Portugal, france, greece, malta, france, UK … but that German honey was like fine perfume, layered, complex, like sunshine and flowers and happiness :). Too bad I can’t find a source!

Anyway, there is one thing I wish to mention for you to pass along to your question posters: please remind people that honey should not be fed to children under the age of two, possibly three, because they lack what’s needed to digest it and it’s actually toxic.

I’ve enjoyed the site. Thanks for your hard work!

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Comment on Raw Honey by Chelladurai http://www.honeytraveler.com/types-of-honey/raw-honey/#comment-423662 Thu, 26 Mar 2015 09:09:19 +0000 http://www.honeytraveler.com/?page_id=229#comment-423662 dear scot

what are the relationship between honey and speaking? And hair colouring?

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Comment on Manuka Honey by Scott http://www.honeytraveler.com/single-flower-honey/manuka-honey/#comment-417826 Sat, 14 Mar 2015 16:34:45 +0000 http://www.honeytraveler.com/#comment-417826 Hi Ada:

The 20+ Bio Active honey may or may not be the same as UMF 20+. According to the Unique Manuka Factor Association, it is not the same. They have licensed the term “UMF” and provide testing and assurance that honey meets the definition. The 20+Bio Active honey is not UMF guaranteed, but if it meets these same specifications, and is independently tested, then you may have some assurance of the potency of the honey. But of course it is still not “UMF” certified. See the Unique Manuka Factor Association Grading System.

…Scott

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